The blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit for drivers in the U.S. is 0.08%; this can result from consuming 4 – 5 regular bottles beer in one hour. This means that anyone who will be caught driving with this BAC level (or higher) can be charged with alcohol-impaired driving or DUI/DWI, driving under the influence/driving while intoxicated. It is alarming that the highest number of drunk-driving cases, as shown in various researches, involve people between 16 and 24 years old.

Impairment is the primary reason why drunk driving is prohibited. It makes a person less sober, and makes his/her reflexes slower. Besides this, impairment also affects a person’s judgment, perception, coordination, reaction time and general ability to focus on the road.

There is no acceptable explanation to driving while intoxicated. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) do not prohibit drivers from drinking anytime they want and as much as they want; what these agencies prohibit is driving afterwards.

Because of the obstinacy of millions of drivers, drunk driving remains to be a major problem. In 2008 alone, 13,838 alcohol-related fatal crashes were reported to the NHTSA; since then, the number of deaths due to this irresponsible road behavior has never gone down to more than 10,000.

A victim of drunk-driving suffers not only physical injuries and trauma resulting from his/her life-threatening experience. It is very likely that his/her family also suffers financial hardship due to his/her costly medical treatment. Situations become worse if the injury leads to disability as this will mean wages lost and higher cost of medical care.

The law firm Law Offices of Ronald J. Resmini, LTD, says, “The deaths and injuries caused by motor vehicle crashes are simply unacceptable. Most car accidents are preventable with responsible, diligent, and focused driving. By doing away with reckless, dangerous, and negligent driving behaviors, lives can be saved and injuries, prevented. One way to accomplish this is by holding these irresponsible drivers accountable for their actions and making them pay for the damage they cause.

Of course no amount of money can begin to compensate for the loss of a loved one or the permanent destruction of your health, but making those who have harmed you face up to what they’ve done and take responsibility for their wrongdoing can provide a deterrent to unsafe driving behaviors while helping to ease the financial burden you are suffering in the wake of a serious car accident.”


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