Colon Cancer

The colon, also known as the large intestine, is the lowest part of the digestive system. Its function is to absorb water and salt from solid wastes (food left over) and then get rid of these after all nutrients have been extracted. A problem that will affect the colon can occur, however, if the growth of the large intestine cells gets out of control. When this happens, the specific resulting problem is colon cancer.

Colon cancers usually start from what is called adenomatous polyps – small, non-cancerous tumors that form on the large intestine’s inner walls. These polyps can become malignant colon cancers over time, though, if these are not removed during a procedure called colonoscopy – when a doctor looks at the intestine’s inner lining.

When malignant tumors grow, it can metastasize, that is travel through the blood and spread to other parts of the body, and invade and destroy other healthy tissues. In 2016, the American Cancer Society estimated 95,270 new cases of colon cancer in the U.S.

Scientists are not certain why cell growth gets out of control and cause the development of colon cancer. They have identified potential factors that can increase the risk of colon cancer, though, including:

  • Damage or mutations to DNA;
  • Genetic predisposition that is inherited from family members;
  • Age, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and tobacco smoking;
  • Diets low in fiber and high in fat, calories, red meat and processed meat; and,
  • Diseases and conditions, including Diabetes, radiation treatment for other cancers, acromegaly (a growth hormone disorder), Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Symptoms of cancer usually depend on where the cancer has spread, where it is located and how big the tumor is. Colon cancer patients, specifically, usually feel symptoms only after the cancer has grown. These symptoms are: diarrhea or constipation, changes in stool consistency, rectal bleeding or blood in the stool, pain, cramps, or gas in the abdomen, painful bowel movement, continual urges to defecate, fatigue, unexplained weight loss, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and iron deficiency (anemia).

The GastroCare LI center, which specializes in GI issues, liver diseases, and nutrition, know that when something is wrong within your body, it can really throw you off and lead to a wide variety of seemingly unrelated symptoms that can all be linked back to some form of internal disorder. Thus, consulting with the right doctors, whether you’ve just started experiencing acute pain and discomfort, or you’ve been dealing with your issues for some time, may help you find relief.


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No one is above the law. This is a saying that has long since been passed down through time as a method of containing chaos and maintaining peace in our time. The law does not discriminate in anything – creed, nationality, skin color, age, or financial class. However much the variables may change, the law and its adjoined consequences are there to be faced by anyone for the appropriate crime.

What, then, are the effects of the justice system to someone on the other side of it – which is to say, on the defending side?

Well, according to the website of the lawyers with Kohler Hart Powell, the consequences of being convicted (or even just accused) of a crime can have extremely detrimental effects on your permanent record. This isn’t a mark that is easily looked over, no matter the nature of the crime or the philosophy that powered the reason why the crime was committed in the first place. Certain opportunities – professional, educational, and even social – will be but a memory from a dream long past. The same may be said for your loved ones or even merely from people who are associated with you or the people who are around you.

There are many things that a reputation can gain for you – and there are many more things that you have left to lose should your reputation be tarnished by a record like this.


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The blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit for drivers in the U.S. is 0.08%; this can result from consuming 4 – 5 regular bottles beer in one hour. This means that anyone who will be caught driving with this BAC level (or higher) can be charged with alcohol-impaired driving or DUI/DWI, driving under the influence/driving while intoxicated. It is alarming that the highest number of drunk-driving cases, as shown in various researches, involve people between 16 and 24 years old.

Impairment is the primary reason why drunk driving is prohibited. It makes a person less sober, and makes his/her reflexes slower. Besides this, impairment also affects a person’s judgment, perception, coordination, reaction time and general ability to focus on the road.

There is no acceptable explanation to driving while intoxicated. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) do not prohibit drivers from drinking anytime they want and as much as they want; what these agencies prohibit is driving afterwards.

Because of the obstinacy of millions of drivers, drunk driving remains to be a major problem. In 2008 alone, 13,838 alcohol-related fatal crashes were reported to the NHTSA; since then, the number of deaths due to this irresponsible road behavior has never gone down to more than 10,000.

A victim of drunk-driving suffers not only physical injuries and trauma resulting from his/her life-threatening experience. It is very likely that his/her family also suffers financial hardship due to his/her costly medical treatment. Situations become worse if the injury leads to disability as this will mean wages lost and higher cost of medical care.

The law firm Law Offices of Ronald J. Resmini, LTD, says, “The deaths and injuries caused by motor vehicle crashes are simply unacceptable. Most car accidents are preventable with responsible, diligent, and focused driving. By doing away with reckless, dangerous, and negligent driving behaviors, lives can be saved and injuries, prevented. One way to accomplish this is by holding these irresponsible drivers accountable for their actions and making them pay for the damage they cause.

Of course no amount of money can begin to compensate for the loss of a loved one or the permanent destruction of your health, but making those who have harmed you face up to what they’ve done and take responsibility for their wrongdoing can provide a deterrent to unsafe driving behaviors while helping to ease the financial burden you are suffering in the wake of a serious car accident.”


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Individuals working in the industrial and manual sectors face a significant amount of risk when performing the daily tasks required by their jobs. The type of work required in fields like manufacturing, construction, and mining leave workers open to many different hazards, including constant exposure to toxic substances.

Without proper safety protocols, there’s no doubt that workers who are constantly exposed to dangerous chemical substances could end up suffering from a host of long-term medical conditions. This is why workplaces that require such exposure are expected to reinforce several safety regulations in order to protect their employees from harm. The first line of defense for these employees is the use appropriate protective equipment when working with such substances.

Employers are also expected to set up protocols that will limit each employee’s exposure to toxic material. This can be easily done by rotating work assignments and adjusting work shifts to ensure that no one person spends too much time working on a task that requires being exposed to harmful substances. A safer work environment can also be created by isolating the use hazardous materials in just one particular area of the entire workplace.

While these tips may seem simple enough to reinforce, many employers still fail to provide efficient solutions for prolonged toxic exposure. Many workers in high-risk industries continue to suffer from life-threatening diseases due to this oversight.

Fortunately, employees suffering due to the many harmful effects of prolonged toxic exposure have the option to pursue several legal avenues against those responsible for their suffering. Those that find themselves in significant financial burden might want to consider pursuing a workers’ compensation claim to help cover mounting medical bills and other related expenses. Those in North Carolina may contact a Raleigh workmen’s compensation attorney to learn more about their available legal options.


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When it comes to deductibles, drivers are given a wide range of options. Will they increase it or will they opt for a lower one? This is one area where most drivers struggle. The higher the deductible, the lower the monthly premiums will be. But then again increasing the deductibles can result to financial difficulties for policy holders.

The main reason drivers choose higher deductibles is because they want to lower their monthly premiums. At the same time, it will give them substantial savings. But then you also have to consider the impact it will have on your insurance coverage. So make sure that you can still get something out of your policy with higher deductibles.

Let us say that you set your deductible at $1,000 while it can save you as much as $50 a month on your insurance policy, increasing your deductible may mean nothing if you are not able to afford the $1,000 deductible when an accident happens. So to make your deductible reasonable, consider the amount that you can afford in case of an accident. Set your deductible at that amount and you will realize that your premium is affordable as well.

A high deductible can work to your advantage if you have a clean driving record or have not been deemed at-fault, you are a low-risk driver who can benefit from increasing your deductible. There are some drivers who get as much as 15% savings on their premiums.

Choosing to increase or decrease your deductible requires a lot of thought on your part. It involves a combination of calculation and self-reflection. Whichever option will help you maximize your insurance policy is the best deal when it comes to your deductibles? Remember you want your insurance provider to cover your expenses and not the other way around. For more advice on making changes to your deductibles, contact your local Madison, WI car accident lawyer.


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